Jon Dale Shadel — Writer, Editor and Producer
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International Travel Guides to Oregon

editor, strategist
An international perspective

An international perspective

Everybody travels a little differently. And international visitors to the Pacific Northwest have a range of desires and expectations that extend beyond mere access to resources in their own languages. That’s why I collaborated with Travel Oregon in 2017 to create an inspirational guide tailored to the needs of international audiences. Published in five languages — English, Chinese, Japanese, German and French — the guide broadly highlights what makes Oregon unlike anywhere else in the United States while doing so in a way that is culturally sensitive and inclusive.

You can read an English PDF of the guide here. Scroll to see links to PDFs translated in four other languages. (For the sake of transparency, please be aware that I have never been an employee of Travel Oregon.)

In Chinese

In Chinese

View a PDF of the full guide in Mandarin here. Chinese travel to the Pacific Northwest has risen dramatically in recent years, and the world’s most populous nation now ranks as Oregon’s third largest overseas market.

In French

In French

View a PDF of the full guide in French here. Cliches about the French hating everything that isn’t French aren’t necessarily true. For example, in the past decade Paris has hosted several cultural festivals dedicated to Portland’s infamous weirdness. France is the fourth largest European market for Oregon tourism.

In Japanese

In Japanese

View a PDF of the full guide in Japanese here. Tokyo, the world’s most populous metropolitan area, has a pop-culture obsession with the comparatively little city of Portland. Recently, international media outlets have reported on the rising number of Portland-centric bars, restaurants and even a lumber-themed mall that’s home to a Portland-based doughnut shop (at Log Road) cropping up in the Japanese capital.

In German

In German

View a PDF of the full guide in German here. The typical German traveler has roughly four to six weeks of paid vacation time per year. Those who come to Oregon often combine their trip with a grand West Coast road trip. Along the way, they seek out Oregon’s DIY culture, craft breweries and classic “Western experiences” like guest ranches.

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