Jon Dale Shadel — Writer, Editor and Producer
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Oregon's Official Guide to the 2017 Eclipse

editor, strategist
Solar Eclipse 101

Solar Eclipse 101

Oregon’s next total solar eclipse won’t occur until 2108. Yea, 2108. In a sentence, that’s why 2017’s eclipse was such a sensation. Oregon was the first place in the nation where the eclipse made landfall and also the state with the highest likelihood of clear skies. The path of totality crossed mostly remote areas, and this put rural Oregonians in a state of panic — hotels were booked years in advance, farmers converted fields into impromptu campgrounds, and bars stocked up on kegs and kegs of beer. It was a really big deal. That’s why I created the state’s official guide to the 2017 eclipse eclipse. (For the sake of transparency, please be aware that I have never been an employee of Travel Oregon.)

Award winner: This one-of-a-kind guide won national recognition. Travel Oregon’s total solar eclipse program received a coveted ESTO Mercury Award in 2018 from the U.S. Travel Association.

Short but sweet

Short but sweet

The total eclipse lasted mere seconds. The event itself was worth the trip, but what to do after it’s over? Extend-your-eclipse-trip ideas were the primary focus of this 24-page guide, which printed tens of thousands of copies and also ran online.

No guide like it

No guide like it

Total solar eclipses are rare events. That’s why there are few guides like this one that have ever been produced. As an editor, this presented challenges: I straggled the line between providing official security information while also creating an inspirational editorial resource that travelers would actually use.

Make it last longer

Make it last longer

Chasing the total solar eclipse of 2017 across the country meant following a relatively narrow band through some of America’s most remote — and scenic — territory. That was especially true in Oregon, where the views are cool for anyone, but a trip requires preparation. This one-of-a-kind guide served up minute-by-minute itineraries for what to do after the eclipse was over, a clever approach that met the concerns of over-crowding while also helping travelers discover lesser-known corners of the Pacific Northwest.

You can read an entire PDF of the official guide here.